Indian airlines are for passengers' convinience

Indian airlines try to do their best to draw more passengers. New flights to Europe, Asia, America; new connecting flights, not so expensive India air tickets, special airfares, relieves, low rebooking fees are not all that Indian airlines do for their passengers. The additional flights eased the pressure for seats and met the demand during the peak season for India-bound travellers. Moreover, Indian Airlines' special advance purchase scheme, 'Summer Saver', were also available on additional capacity to Hyderabad, Kochi, Kozhikode, Chennai and Thiruvananthapuram. This year, the additional services have been made available for sale much in advance to enable travelers to plan their vacation as well as take the benefit of special Indian Airlines' offers for advance purchase schemes.

Indian airlines try to do their best to draw more passengers. New flights to Europe, Asia, America; new connecting flights, not so expensive India air tickets, special airfares, relieves, low rebooking fees are not all that Indian airlines do for their passengers.

The history of Indian aviation started in 1910 when the young Maharaja of Patiala, Bhupinder Singh, interested in aviation, sent his Chief Engineer to Eurpoe for a study with orders to buy three planes, including a Bleriot monoplane and Farman biplanes, which arrived in the Punjab later that year.

One year later, in 1911, on February 18 domestic commercial aviation was born in India. Henri Piquet, flying a Humber biplane, carried mall from Allahabad to Naini Junction, some six miles away.

In 1927 India was connect with the outside world for the first time through an air network. The world's first officially christened 'national airline', Britain's Imperial Airways extends to Empire Routes to India. A de Havilland Hercules flies the Cairo-Basra-Karachi-Jodhpur-Delhi route. It is also the first domestic passenger flight to be operated in India. Passengers could be for the first time fly from Karachi to Jodhpur and to Delhi on Imperial Airways.

In 1953 Indian Airlines and Air India International were set up after legislation came into force to nationalize the entire airline industry in India. Eight former independent domestic airlines - Deccan Airways, Airways India, Bharat Airways, Himalayan Aviation, Kalinga Air Lines, Indian National Airways, Air India, Air Services of India - were merged to from the domestic national carrier. Air India International took over the international routes. Indian Airlines Corporation inherited a large fleet of 74 DC-3 Dakotas, 12 Vikings, 3 DC-4s and various smaller crafts.

Later, in 1989, Indian Airlines became one of the earliest airline in the world to induct the revolutionary fly-by-wire A320s made by France's Airbus Industrie into its fleet. The airline's first pure-jet was a Caravelle, inducted in 1964.

As you see Indian airlines have been trying to do their beast to keep abreast with the times. What are they doing nowadays for the passengers from all over the world?

For example, this summer Indian Airlines operated as many as 29 additional flights to cater to the peak season demand. Starting from June 18 until July 15, the additional flights planned provided about 5,000 extra seats during the peak travel period. Out of the total 29 flights, five were operated with Airbus A300 aircraft and 24 flights with Airbus A320 aircraft. The carrier operated 23 additional services from Sharjah and six additional services from Dubai.

The additional flights eased the pressure for seats and met the demand during the peak season for India-bound travellers. Moreover, Indian Airlines' special advance purchase scheme, 'Summer Saver', were also available on additional capacity to Hyderabad, Kochi, Kozhikode, Chennai and Thiruvananthapuram.

This year, the additional services have been made available for sale much in advance to enable travelers to plan their vacation as well as take the benefit of special Indian Airlines' offers for advance purchase schemes.

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