Bollywood and Indian films

What comes to your mind when you hear the word "Bollywood", even for the first time? You will definitely say that it resembles the word "Hollywood". Thus, it may be connected with film industry. And you will be absolutely right. To be precise it is connected with Indian film industry. Indian films that have so many fans are produced here in Indian film studios. It is needless to say that Indian films have a wide auditory. Bollywood and the other major cinematic hubs (Tamil - Kollywood, Telugu - Tollywood, bengali, Kannada, and Malayalam) constitute the broader Indian film industry; its output is the largest in the world in terms of number of films produced and in number of tickets sold. Bollywood is a strong part of popular culture of not only India and the rest of not only Indian subcontinent, but also of the Middle East parts of Africa, parts of Southeast Asia, and among the South Asian diaspora worldwide.

What comes to your mind when you hear the word "Bollywood", even for the first time? You will definitely say that it resembles the word "Hollywood". Thus, it may be connected with film industry. And you will be absolutely right. To be precise it is connected with Indian film industry. Indian films that have so many fans are produced here in Indian film studios. It is needless to say that Indian films have a wide auditory. They attract cinemagoers by its opulence, luxury, beautiful and graceful Indian actresses and handsome Indian actors. Traditional Indian outfit - sari and sherwani - is really a piece of art. Melodramatic and tragic Indian movie themes make us crying. Even men who always try to hide their emotions may be seen with tears in their eyes.

Let's go back to the name of the place where most Indian films are produced. What does Bollywood derive from? The name consists of two words "Bombay", the old name of modern Mumbai, and Hollywood, the center of the USA film industry. These two words have been merged and as a result we have Bollywood. Some historians and cinema critics say that this name makes Indian film industry look like a poor cousin of Hollywood.

Bollywood and the other major cinematic hubs (Tamil - Kollywood, Telugu - Tollywood, bengali, Kannada, and Malayalam) constitute the broader Indian film industry; its output is the largest in the world in terms of number of films produced and in number of tickets sold. Bollywood is a strong part of popular culture of not only India and the rest of not only Indian subcontinent, but also of the Middle East parts of Africa, parts of Southeast Asia, and among the South Asian diaspora worldwide.

Cinema first came to India in 1896, when the Lumiere Brothers' Cinematographe showed six short films in the Watson Hotel. Three years later Harishchandra Bhatvadekar shot and exhibited two short films. Following that, there were several attempts to film staged plays and imported films were shown in the first decade of the 20th century. The first indigenous silent feature film was produced by Dhundiraj Govind Phalke, also known as Dada Saheb - the father of cinema. The cinema industry was well established by 1920, producing 27 Indian films per annum.

Indian have been alsways trying to reflect all the events that happened in the history of India. For example, the 30's a decade of protests against British rule and social injustices. Producers, such as Bombay Talkies, made serious films that echoed this. These continued into the 1940's and led into the golden age of Indian Cinema in the 1950's.

Another feature of Indian films is music, dances, and song. Watch any Indian film and you will have an idea of what Indian culture, Indian music, Indian songs, and Indian dances are.

Songs typically comment on the action taking place in the movie, in several ways. Sometimes, a song is worked into the plot, so that a character has a reason to sing; other times, a song is an externalization of a character's thoughts, or presages an event that has not occurred yet in the plot of the movie. In this case, the event is almost always two characters' falling in love.

The dancing in Indian films, especially older ones, is primarily modeled on Indian dance: classical dance styles, dances of historic northern Indian courtesans, or folk dance. In modern Indian films, Indian dance elements often blend with Western dance styles, though it is not unusual to see Western pop and pure classical dance numbers side by side in the same film. The hero or heroine will often perform with a troupe of supporting dancers, usually of the same sex. If the hero and heroine dance and sing a pas-de-deux, it is often staged in beautiful natural surroundings or architecturally grand settings.

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