Asian Food - a Healthy Addiction!

More than 3/4 of the Asia population is agriculture-based. Twice as much fish is consumed in this region compared to other forms of animal protein, although the staple food throughout Asian is rice, which has been cultivated for thousands of years. Today, Asian cooking has sparked interest of people all over the world. Asian food is one of the healthiest addictions you can have!

In the 1950s, Asian food meant chop-suey and fortune cookies to most people. Today that has all changed. A rich and increasingly authentic variety of Asian food is available all over the world at restaurants and in supermarkets.

America's increased sophistication about food has been fueled by new tastes acquired while traveling overseas, and by the growing number of immigrants living here who have created a market for their local food. The popularity of vegetarianism has sparked great interest in Asian food.

There's such a variety of Asian food that everyone can find something to please their taste buds. Peanut and coconut mixtures of the tropical Southeast, Indian curries, barbecued beef of Central Asian steppes, familiar Chinese stir-fried dishes and Japanese sushi - it's all very different and yet very Asian.

Simple daily meals and elaborate feasts characterize all Southeast Asian culinary cultures. Cooking is economically efficient as people use wok cooking, which requires a low amount of fuel and makes deep-frying easy. Also, meat and vegetables are typically chopped into small pieces prior to cooking, which mean that food cooks very quickly. Most food is cooked by quick blanching or stir-frying and steaming.

Asians are concerned with nutrition, economy, and ease of preparation as it relates to their food.

Due to the close proximity of the borders between countries in Southeast Asia, and to combined influences from India and China that have affected indigenous taste and cooking styles, the ingredients are similar throughout most of the region while they are still used by each culture to suit their palate and taste.

Asian influence can be seen in many countries of the world today. A Chinese horticulturalist working in Oregon, Ah Bing, bred the red, sweet Bing cherry that is now an American favorite, while in Florida Lue Gim Gong experimented with oranges, perfecting a variety that was resistant to frost and able to grow in Florida. Those were the two most important contributions to American agriculture.

Many people around the globe are starting to embrace Asian food for their home cooking, which creates a growing demand for Chinese cooking teachers. The Houston, Texas' renowned Chinese cooking teacher, Dorothy Huang has taught thousands of people to embrace Chinese cooking in their own homes. Her first cookbook, "Dorothy Huang's Chinese Cooking" has engendered huge appeal and acceptance of Asian food locally and nationally. Highly respected as a Chinese food consultant, Huang has developed recipes for major cookware and food companies.

She is a member of the Houston Culinary Guild and the International Association of Culinary Professionals. Huang's knowledge of dietetics and her own experience in cooking convinced her that Chinese food provided an ideal combination of nutritional value, easy preparation, and taste appeal. Throughout the years she has returned repeatedly to Asia to study and hone her skills under distinguished chefs.

Huang not only trained the chefs, she created the menu, and assisted in planning and outfitting the kitchens.

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