Christian and Jewish wedding

Christian and Jewish wedding traditions overview.

A Christian wedding is usually conducted in a church. The bride traditionally wears a white gown and the groom wears a black suit. The bride's head is covered with a white veil and a crown ? a tiara or a bunch of white flowers, and she holds a flower bouquet in her hand.

The Christian wedding ceremony involves the exchange of wedding bands and marriage vows by the couple. The wedding rings are first blessed by the priest to instill in the bearers an everlasting love and an earnest faith. The proceeding of the Christian wedding ceremony is accompanied by choir singing. The ceremony comes to an end with the priest giving the final blessing to the couple. At the end the gatherings shower their blessings on the newlyweds. The last formality is that of the couple signing the register.

There are as many wedding traditions, as there are peoples in the world. Each nationality keeps to its own traditions, which have been developing through centuries. The customs depend on the historical and cultural development of a particular country, but there is a nation that has been spread all over the world. These are the Jews. There are American, Russian and many other ?ethnic groups? of Jews.

The Jewish wedding ceremony only requires the man to give the ring to the woman, but sometimes the Rabbi allows a double-ring ceremony. The groom places the ring on the bride's index finger. This finger is chosen because its being used as the ?pointer? when reading the Torah.

It's often necessary for the couple to borrow a family ring for the wedding. The groom should ?buy? the ring from a family member and ?sell? it back after the wedding.

In the Jewish wedding tradition, the wedding ring should be simple, a band with no details, or stones, and nothing engraved.
Traditionally, the Jewish wedding ceremony begins with the bride and groom signing the Ketuba, a marriage contract, written in Aramaic. The document will be framed and placed in the couples? home. Although the custom continues, the document has little legal significance.

After the Ketuba is signed, the Rabbi and the two fathers lead the procession of the groom and male guests into the bride's chamber for the badekan (veiling ceremony). This custom of a Jewish wedding comes from the biblical story of Jacob, who had been working for seven years to marry Rachel, only to discover that her father had substituted the older, blind Leah, under heavy veiling. Grooms still come to look at their bride before the ceremony and actually place the veil over her face.

Once the bride is veiled, the ceremony is ready to begin. The Jewish wedding ceremony begins with the procession of the wedding party members. At the wedding site both sets of parents escort the bride and groom down the aisle. The marriage ceremony is performed under a special canopy, called a huppah. After exchanging vows, seven marriage blessings are read.

At the end of the wedding ceremony, the Rabbi asks the best man to put a wine glass, wrapped into a white cloth or in a special bag that the couple provides, under the groom's right foot. The groom steps on the glass and breaks it. This symbolizes man's short life on earth and makes the newlyweds remember even in the midst of the happy event, that sorrow may await them in future life.

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